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[Digital focus stacking] Army ant (Eciton burchellii) Ants of the the subfamily Ecitoninae ? the army ants ? form large, nomadic colonies which roam the soils of the Neotropics. The most characteristic trait of army ants is the ability to conduct highly organized mass raids during which they remove large amounts of booty. For the army ant Eciton buchellii it has been estimated that a single colony removes up to 40g of dry animal matter and Eciton hamatum harvests 90.000 insects during one day. The raids of army ants are presumed to prevent the establishment of climax communities and thus to enhance arthropod diversity. It is therefore not surprising that army ants are considered keystone predators in the Neotropics..The picture shows the head of a soldier with sickle-shaped mandibles. The soldier caste serves exclusively as a defensive force in army ants. Picture was taken in cooperation with the "Staatl. Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe".

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08-11-25_121707_M=B_R=6_S=3.jpg
Copyright
Solvin Zankl
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3394x5100 / 5.5MB
Contained in galleries
Ant Portrait | Ameisen Porträt
[Digital focus stacking] Army ant (Eciton burchellii) Ants of the the subfamily Ecitoninae ? the army ants ? form large, nomadic colonies which roam the soils of the Neotropics. The most characteristic trait of army ants is the ability to conduct highly organized mass raids during which they remove large amounts of booty. For the army ant Eciton buchellii it has been estimated that a single colony removes up to 40g of dry animal matter and Eciton hamatum harvests 90.000 insects during one day. The raids of army ants are presumed to prevent the establishment of climax communities and thus to enhance arthropod diversity. It is therefore not surprising that army ants are considered keystone predators in the Neotropics..The picture shows the head of a soldier with sickle-shaped mandibles. The soldier caste serves exclusively as a defensive force in army ants.  Picture was taken in cooperation with the "Staatl. Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe".